Trumpet Podcast

Selected Duets for Trumpet Podcast

Selected Duets for Trumpet Podcast– Using his home recording studio, David has recorded, and is podcasting, some of the best duets from the book Selected Duets for Trumpet, Volume 1 Edited by H.Voxman. These trumpet duets are standard learning resources for trumpet students taking trumpet lessons and are fun to play for all trumpet players. The trumpet duets are also valuable materials to be used by two trumpets in performance. They are especially effective for wedding ceremonies, church services and other occasions calling for majestic or elegant brass music.

These recordings are also available as a free trumpet podcast. In addition to listening to the trumpet duets by visiting this web page, you may subscribe to the Selected Duets for Trumpet podcast using iTunes or any other podcast software. By subscribing to this trumpet podcast, you will be sure to get the latest episode every time you start iTunes on your computer.

As an added music education resource for trumpet students and trumpet teachers, David has also recorded each of these duets in a trumpet 2 only version that can be used as a trumpet play along. “Both Trumpets” is a recording of the two trumpet parts together. “Trumpet 2 Part Only” is a recording of the second trumpet part alone for the trumpet play along. The “Trumpet 2 Part Only” duets start with metronome clicks lasting for 2 measures so you can come right in with the recording. Use the Trumpet One part in your Selected Duets book to play along with the “Trumpet 2 Part Only” accompaniment recordings.

School instrumental music teachers, directing band and orchestra, as well as trumpet instructors, trumpet and brass ensemble directors, conductors, music educators and others involved in music education may share these podcasts and associated recordings with their trumpet students. Professional trumpeters and other brass players engaged in giving private trumpet lessons may find this trumpet podcast to be a valuable adjunct to their instruction. Students may use them to review how their assigned trumpet duet should sound with both trumpet parts as well as to practice the duets with the “Trumpet 2 Part Only” free play along trumpet tracks.

The Selected Duets for Trumpet Podcast available on iTunes, contains the recordings of both trumpets. Recordings of the corresponding “Trumpet 2 Part Only” play along trumpet accompaniment tracks can be found here on this page. You can listen to and download these free trumpet play alongs.

Episode 44
Page45 #11, Allemande
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 45 Number 11, Allemande, performed by David Summer.
This third duet in the series by Joseph Boismortier is an Allemande. An allemande is a moderate tempo dance form that was popular during the baroque. An allemande is generally the first or second part of a suite, with a “suite” being a collection of dances.
Again there are several “question and answer” sections, as we’ve seen in previous duets. But this time the “answers” start before the end of the “questions”. This may prove to be a rhythmic challenge for a student along with the 16th note runs in the second half of the duet.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 84.
Episode 43
Page44 #10, Gigue
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 44 Number 10, Gigue, performed by David Summer.
This second duet in the series of duets by Boismortier is another Gigue and again it’s in 6/8 time at a fast tempo, played “in 2”. The student may be challenged by the tied over dotted quarter notes in the last part of the piece. Once more, the student has to be able to hear continuous eighth notes in order to place all the eighths correctly. In this case, that’s helped by the fact that the second trumpet part is playing eighths under the first trumpet dotted quarter notes.
There are also several “question and answer” sections, as we’ve seen in previous duets. The duet is in the key of G with a brief foray in a minor in the middle and g minor at the end.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 88.
Episode 42
Page43 #9, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 43 Number 9, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
Joseph Bodin de Boismortier was a French composer active in the first half of the 1700s. Boismortier was one of the first composers to make an income from publishing his compositions rather than writing for a patron. Up until that time, financially successful composers wrote compositions, often on demand, for wealthy patrons. These patrons were usually royalty.
Boismortier was the first French composer to use the Italian concerto form, in his six concertos for five flutes op. 15.
For this performance, only the first repeat is taken and the metronome setting is eigth note = 112.

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Episode 41
Page42 #8, Maestoso
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 42 Number 8, Maestoso, performed by David Summer.
Maestoso, the defacto title of this duet, again means “march-like”. Other synonyms include majestic, stately and dignified. This duet is also in 3/8 and includes some dotted 16th – 32nd note figures that are usually played with a slight detachment between the two notes.
The range in the 32nd note runs may prove an insurmountable challenge for an inexperienced student. If that’s the case, the teacher may want to assign the trumpet two part, instead of the usual trumpet one part, for practice. The trumpet two part is actually a bit more rhythmically interesting in the second half of the duet than the trumpet one part is.
The metronome setting for this performance is eigth note = 80.
Episode 40
Page41 #7, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 41 Number 7, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
This is another good duet for studying 6/8 played in 2. The student has to be able to hear continuous eigth notes in order to place all the eigths correctly. To help with this, the teacher might try playing the trumpet one part with all eigth notes for a line or 2 at the same time the student plays the part as written. This should help the student to understand how to subdivide 6/8 played “in 2”.
For this performance, the Poco meno (meaning “less motion” or to slow down) is ignored for the sake of students playing along with the trumpet 2 parts posted on the summersong.net website.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 92.
Episode 39
Page40 #6, Andantino
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 40 Number 6, Andantino, performed by David Summer.
This duet is in a time signature that may be unfamiliar to a student, 3/8. It may take some time for a student to get used to seeing and playing the 32nd notes. The teacher should point out that the 32nd notes are grouped into groups of 4 notes, as a visual affordance for 4 16th notes being contained within one beat.
Andantino, the simple title of this duet, is a tempo that is slightly faster than Andante but slower than Moderato, Andantino being the diminutive of the word Andante. The beginning of the duet is marked pianissimo and melodioso. The melodioso marking indicating that the piece should be played melodically, with much expression.
The metronome setting for this performance is eigth note = 84.
Episode 38
Page39 #5, Tamburin
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 39 Number 5, Tamburin, performed by David Summer.
Nicolas Chédeville was an 18 century French composer who wrote many pieces for the musette or hurdy-gurdy. This duet, with its many scale passages, was probably well suited to the amateur hurdy gurdy players who were the target audience of Chédeville.
Many passages in this duet are musical echoes. Repeating one or two measures, with the repeated passage being played at a softer dynamic, manifests the echo quality.
The title, Tamburin, probably refers to a tambourine. The tambourine is a percussion instrument that has been used for hundreds of years. It was probably last commonly used in western music in the 1960’s as part of pop-rock.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 92.

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Episode 37
Page38 #4, Rondo
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 38 Number 4, Rondo, performed by David Summer.
Michel de la Barre, the composer of this duet, was also a famous flutist. He is credited with being the first composer to publish music for solo flute. This duet does have a somewhat delicate, flute-like quality to it.
The duet is in the key of F# minor, with a brief foray into C# minor, and contains several E sharps and B sharps that should be pointed out to the student. This is a good opportunity for the teacher to review the concept of enharmonic notes.
The held-over notes in lines 3 and 6 may also present a rhythmic challenge for a student. The teacher may want to assign both parts of this duet to a student since both parts are generally of equal melodic importance.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 108.
Episode 36
Page34 #1, Rondinetto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 34 Number 1, Rondinetto, performed by David Summer.
The composer of this duet, Louis A. Saint-Jacome, was also a solo cornetist and musical arranger. Originally from Paris France, Saint-Jacome moved to London, England where he worked as a musical arranger for the Messieurs La Fleur Publishing Company. While there, Saint-Jacome wrote his famous Grand Method For Trumpet Or Cornet in 1870. This comprehensive trumpet or cornet method book is still in wide use today, having been edited by another famous trumpeter, Claude Gordon. Later in his life Saint-Jacome became cornet tuner and tester for the Besson brass instrument company in London.
This duet begins in the key of Bb and then changes to Bb minor in the Trio section. Usually this section is played a bit slower than the rest of the piece, but while making this recording I’ve kept the tempo consistent for the sake of the play along track that accompanies this podcast.
In this recording, there are no repeats taken except for the DS and the metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 84.
Episode 35
Page30 #5, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 30 Number 5, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
This is the last duet in the series of 5 duets by French composer Pierre François Clodomir. The teacher should take the opportunity to point out the various scales and arpeggios that are clearly present here.
The student may need to be cautioned not to let the tempo run away on the 16th note runs and to watch the key change on the second page. Again, a light tongue is helpful here.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 80.
Episode 34
Page28 #4, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 28 Number 4, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
This duet, by Clodomir, should be played with a light tongue and strict observance of the staccato markings. These carry through almost the entire duet with only brief respites. These are marked dolce (sweetly) and grazioso (gracefully).
There are also several key changes present. The piece starts in the key of g minor. Then, at the first “dolce” marking the key changes to the relative major, Bb major. On the second line of the second page of the duet, the key changes back to g minor with a descending figure that leads back into a restatement of the initial melody. The third page of the duet changes the key again, from g minor to the parallel major, G major. (This time the key change is marked) The second line of the 3rd page has another key change, from G major to the relative minor, e minor. This is short lived as the key goes back to G major before the Da Capo.
An inexperienced student may find that the duet taxes his or her endurance, as it is relatively long. The teacher should allow rests as needed, but at the same time may point out that the student should try to increase his or her endurance so that they can play pieces of this length with out a rest, if needed.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 96.

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Episode 33
Page27 #3, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 27 Number 3, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
This next duet by French composer Pierre Clodomir consists of 6 short sections, with a key change in the middle of the duet. The second to last line also changes key, to D major, although the change is not noted in the key signature.
An inexperienced student may be challenged by the Trumpet One rhythms in the second half of the duet being different from those in the Trumpet Two part.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 120.
Episode 32
Page26 #2, Moderato
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 26 Number 2, Moderato, performed by David Summer.
This is the second duet in the series of 5 duets by French composer Pierre François Clodomir. When presenting this duet to a student, the teacher should point out the G arpeggio in the 1st and 3rd measures of the 2nd trumpet part. In both cases, these arpeggios are “answered” by a D7 arpeggio in the trumpet one part. The duet also features several scale sections, which briefly take the piece out of the key of G and into the key of Eb.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.
Episode 31
Page25 #1, Moderato
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 25 Number 1, Moderato, performed by David Summer.
This duet begins a section of 5 duets by Pierre François Clodomir. Clodomir, a 19th century French composer, wrote a brass method book, published in 1870 entitled “Méthode élémetaire de cornet à pistons”.
In this first duet in the series, special attention should be paid to the syncopated 2nd trumpet part in the 4th line. Also, right before the daCapo, this duet contains a brief “question and answer” section, as we’ve seen in several of the previous duets.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.
Episode 30
Page24 #22, Giga
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 24 Number 22, Giga, performed by David Summer.
A Giga like the previously titled duet “Gigue” is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. Again, this is 6/8 time at a fast tempo, played “in 2”. That is, heavily accenting the first and the fourth beats of the measure. The first section of the duet features some canonic, or imitative musical phrases.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 88.

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Episode 29
Page24 #21, Musette
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 24 Number 21, Musette, performed by David Summer.
A Musette is probably best known as the name of an instrument that is similar to a bagpipe. It was popular in the 1700’s and used in a wide variety of music including chamber music and operas. The piccolo oboe, also known as the piccoloboe, the smallest and highest pitched member of the oboe family, pitched in E-flat or F above the regular oboe, is also historically known as an oboe musette. Finally, Bal-musette is a style of French music and dance that first became popular in Paris in the 1880s.
Since this Musette duet is labeled as being from the 18th Century, it’s probably named “Musette” because a Musette (the instrument similar to a bagpipe) was the instrument the composer intended the duet to be performed on. This is a good duet for students to practice counting and performing 6/8 meter “in 6” rather than the more common 6/8 “in 2”.
The metronome setting for this performance is eigth note = 96.
Episode 28
Page23 #20, Minuet
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 23 Number 20, Minuet, performed by David Summer.
This minuet, by Haag, is evocative of summer concerts in the park, especially in the trio section of the duet. Recall that a “trio section” is the third section of a piece and generally changes key, adding flats. “Trio” sections are especially prevalent in marches.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 96.
Episode 27
Page22 #19, Jumping Dance
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 22 Number 19, Jumping Dance, performed by David Summer.
This duet is reminiscent of the previous duets that were imitative of a hunting horn, except this time the image is meant to be of a dance that includes jumping in the air. There are some back and forth sections where, at times, the student will be playing alone.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 76.
Episode 26
Page21 #18, Time Study
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 21 Number 18, Time Study, performed by David Summer.
This is a rhythmically interesting duet because of all the meter changes. These are indicated in the unusual time signature. The almost constant meter changes can prove a real challenge for a student, but the duet makes an interesting study. This is an especially good duet to have the student practice both parts of.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.

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Episode 25
Page20 #17, Andante
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 20 Number 17, Andante, performed by David Summer.
This duet is simply entitled Andante, which translates roughly to “at a walking pace”. The second part of the piece makes use of a simple, but effective descending line in the Trumpet 2 part, which nicely offsets the Trumpet 1 melody line.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 92.
Episode 24
Page20 #16, Processional
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 20 Number 16, Processional, performed by David Summer.
A processional is generally a slow march tune. Think of the “Bridal March” or “Pomp and Circumstance”. The tempo marking “maestoso”, meaning march-like, reflects this. A processional is also thought of as stately, dignified and majestic. This processional has two sections and, with the second repeat omitted, follows an AABA musical pattern.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 92.
Episode 23
Page18 #15, Lustily
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 18 Number 15, Lustily, performed by David Summer.
This is another duet with an interesting tempo marking, open to interpretation. I’m taking this one to mean “with exuberance”. Call and response sections are another feature, along with a poco allargando tempo marking at the end. “Poco allargando” generally means to get a bit slower and broader.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 126.
Episode 22
Page18 #14, Allegretto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 18 Number 14, Allegretto, performed by David Summer.
Here is another duet that changes time signature midway through the piece. This time the composer is Walrad Guericke and the duet is probably from his collection of duets for two recorders.
The 2/4 section of the duet is written in a style that is in marked contrast to the first section (in 3/4). The 2/4 section has a jagged sound that is amplified by the use of an ascending grace note in the first and third measures as well as several measures of staccato eight notes.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.

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Episode 21
Page17 #13, Allegro
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 17 Number 13, Allegro, performed by David Summer.
This third, and last, duet by Metger is fairly complex rhythmically when both trumpet parts are played together. It’s rare to see the rhythm pattern “dotted-eighth, sixteenth, eighth” played against 3 eighth notes for example, as occurs more than once here. The duet also changes meter from 6/8 to 4/4, with the quarter note in the new meter equal to the dotted quarter in the previous meter.
All of this can prove challenging to the student, but provides the teacher with a good opportunity to introduce changing meters and to show how the time change is marked to make the transition smooth. This type of meter change happens frequently in musicals, especially in dance sections.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 96.
Episode 20
Page16 #12, Merrily
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 16 Number 12, Merrily, performed by David Summer.
This second duet by Metger, while not strictly a cannon, contains many imitative passages. It’s a happy sounding duet, clearly living up to it’s tempo marking, “Merrily”. Again, since the second trumpet part is rhythmically different from the first trumpet and is often “just behind” the first trumpet, a student can find this duet a special challenge to play with the teacher.
But, that’s partly what this podcast is about. If you’re seeing this description on iTunes, or another podcast reader, check out the trumpet podcast page on the summersong website, www.summersong.net, for second trumpet play along parts to all of these deuts.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 126.
Episode 19
Page15 #11, Allegro non troppo
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 15 Number 11, Allegro non troppo, performed by David Summer.
Like a previous duet this is a “cannon”, a musical imitation. It’s titled simply Allegro non troppo, meaning fast, but not too fast.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 120.
Episode 18
Page14 #9, Larghetto
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 14 Number 9, Larghetto, performed by David Summer.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is not a name you often see associated with the trumpet. Mozart’s works for wind instruments concentrated on the flute and clarinet. This duet was likely originally a duet for one of those instruments. Of course Mozart, firmly in the classical period, is probably most famous for his operas.
Larghetto, the de facto title of this duet, is a tempo marking meaning a bit faster than Largo. It’s often a challenge for a student to maintain a steady, slow tempo. I’ve found that generally students will have a tendency to start to speed up, particularly when reaching the second half of the duet, where the second trumpet’s rhythm is much different from that of the first trumpet.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 76.

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Episode 17
Page13 #8, Chorus from Preciosa
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 13 Number 8, Chorus from Preciosa, performed by David Summer.
Carl Maria von Weber was a German composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist and critic. He was one of the first composers of the Romantic school of music. Von Weber is probably best known for his operas and his works for Clarinet. This duet is taken from the Chorus section of Preciosa Op. 78, an Overture for soloist, chorus and orchestra.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.
Episode 16
Page12 #7, Gigue
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 12 Number 7, Gigue, performed by David Summer.
A Gigue is an energetic dance, in a fast 6/8. This is a lively baroque dance form that originated from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century and usually appears at the end of a suite. Like many of the previous duets in 6/8, this one is played “in 2” by playing at a fast tempo and accenting the first and fourth beats of each measure.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 92.
Episode 15
Page12 #6, Adagio
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 12 Number 6, Adagio, performed by David Summer.
Simply entitled Adagio, this 18th Century duet can prove a challenge for students in a several areas. First is keeping a steady tempo at this slow tempo. Students are prone to rush, especially when playing the 1st trumpet solo passages. Next are the 32nd notes that occur in the 3rd beat in several measures. I sometimes instruct my students to think of these are if they were grace notes, which they may well have been in the original version of this piece. Also slurring these 32nd notes may challenge the student, particularly as they occur in an ascending passage. The advice I give here is to make a slight “flick” of the tongue, while making sure to maintain the air stream, when you get to these notes.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 72.
Episode 14
Page12 #5, Menuet
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 12 Number 5, Menuet, performed by David Summer.
This duet is entitled “Menuet”. It’s a spelling variation on the word “Minuet”. As previously noted, a minuet is a social dance of French origin, for two people, in 3/4 time. This minuet follows the classic early form, with two sections of eight bars each.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 96.

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Episode 13
Page11 #4, Hunting Song
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 11 Number 4, Hunting Song, performed by David Summer.
This duet continues the hunting theme but this time in 2/4 instead of 6/8. A challenge for the student here is that the second trumpet is generally playing different rhythms than the first trumpet.
Again, because it’s a short duet, I’ve repeated the entire duet and metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 104.
Episode 12
Page11 #3, There Rode Three Horsemen
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 11 Number 3, There Rode Three Horsemen, performed by David Summer.
Similar in style to the duet entitled Hunting Scene and also played as 6/8 “in 2”. It can be a challenge for a student to properly subdivide the rhythms in this duet. Particularly the 5 beats represented in the dotted quarter tied to a quarter note.
Because it’s a short duet, I’ve repeated the entire duet and the metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 76.
Episode 11
Page10 #2, Christmas Song
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 10 Number 2, Christmas Song, performed by David Summer.
This is another simple duet with an interesting tempo marking. Little clue is giving to the origin of this duet. Perhaps it celebrates Sinterklaas, the Dutch figure that formed the basis for the North American figure of Santa Claus.
Because it’s a short duet, I’ve repeated the entire duet and the metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 132.
Episode 10
Page10 #1, Old German Song
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 10 Number 1, Old German Song, performed by David Summer.
The composer of this duet, Valentin Rathgeber, was a versatile and prolific baroque composer. He was one of the most popular and respected composers from southern Germany. His works for trumpet include a “Concerto for 2 trumpets, 2 violins & continuo in D major”.
This simple, but effective, duet is reminiscent of a cannon at the beginning and contains an interesting tempo marking, open to interpretation. The trumpet 2 part of the duet stays down in the lower register of the trumpet, or “down in the mud” as brass players like to say, through most of the piece.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 112.

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Episode 9
Page9 #9, Evening Story
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 9 Number 9, Evening Story, performed by David Summer.
Evening Story is the last of the series of duets by Viktor Korda. This duet is an example of “program music”. Program music is intended to invoke images in the mind of the listener by musically representing a scene, image or mood. In this case the scene is that of a story being told at the end of the day, perhaps outside on porch in the summer time. The relaxing mood being further hinted at by the tempo marking “Andante tranquillo”, implying the tranquility of a warm summer evening or maybe a winter evening indoors next to a fireplace.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 88.
Episode 8
Page8 #8, Rustic March
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 8 Number 8, Rustic March, performed by David Summer.
The second trumpet starts both of the first 2 sections of this march. The third section of the march (the “Trio” section) changes key, as is typical in a march. What is not typical here is that the key change is usually to the subdominant (one flat added). Here the change is key is to the dominant (one flat is removed). The trio section in this march duet is typical however, in that it is in a contrasting style to the rest of the march.
For this performance, the repeats are not taken, but the Da Capo is and the metronome setting is quarter note = 108.
Episode 7
Page7 #7, Minuet
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 7 Number 7, Minuet, performed by David Summer.
A minuet is a social dance of French origin, for two people, in 3/4 time. This simple, but elegant, minuet has the trumpet 2 part echoing the trumpet 1 part a fifth lower in several places.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 112.
Episode 6
Page6 #6, Hunting Scene
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 6 Number 6, Hunting Scene, performed by David Summer.
This duet invokes an image of a European style hunting expedition, complete with the sounding of the hunting horn (the “Trompe-de-Chasse”), from which the modern French Horn is descended.
The time signature for this duet is 6/8. When 6/8 is at a fast tempo, it’s often said to be “in 2”. The performer heavily accents 2 beats to a measure, the first and the fourth beats.
The metronome setting for this performance is dotted quarter note = 72.
Episode 5
Page5 #5, Polonaise
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 5 Number 5, Polonaise, performed by David Summer.
A “polonaise” is a slower dance in 3/4 time. It is of Polish origin (polonaise is French for “Polish”). The Polish composer Frédéric Chopin is considered a master of the polonaise.
Again, dynamics play an important part in this duet, helping to provide melodic contrast between the different phrases in the piece.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.
Episode 4
Page4 #4, March in G
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 4 Number 4, March in G, performed by David Summer.
This “march” is similar to the first duet in the book and features many “staccato”, or “detached” passages. The student should note the dynamic contrasts that set off the different sections of this piece from one another.
The first repeat is omitted but the Da Capo is taken. The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 108.
Episode 3
Page4 #3, Canon
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 4 Number 3, Canon, performed by David Summer.
A musical “cannon” is an imitation of sorts. Here, the first trumpet part begins with the melody and the second trumpet part imitates that melody a measure later. This “delay” in the second trumpet part sometimes proves a challenge for students to keep their place in the piece. This is a good duet to have the student and teacher switch parts, with the student taking the second trumpet part, after they have played through the duet twice.
Since this trumpet duet is particularly short, the entire duet is repeated. The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 100.
Episode 2
Page3 #2, Petite Waltz
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 3 Number 2, Petite Waltz, performed by David Summer.
This “little waltz” by Korda, is a pretty piece and provides a good opportunity for the teacher to explain just what a waltz is to the student.
In performance, it’s important to keep this duet moving. It should be played in a flowing style, like most waltzes, with a light attack, particularly in the middle section.
There are no repeats in this performance and the metronome setting is quarter note = 116.
Episode 1
Page2 #1, March Time
Selected Duets for Trumpet, Page 2 Number 1, March Time, performed by David Summer.
This first duet in the Selected Duets for Trumpet book, Volume 1, is from Nine Duets by the composer Viktor Korda. The tempo is indicated as “March Time”. Like most tempo markings, this one is open to interpretation. I like to interpret it to mean “fairly brisk, but not too fast”. This march, like many marches, features a trio section. This is simply the third section of a march. However, unlike most other marches, this trio section does not change key.
This may not the best duet in the book to start a student with. Some of the rhythmic figures, particularly the 8th followed by two 16ths can be a stumbling block for a first, or possibly even a second year student.
The metronome setting for this performance is quarter note = 96.

Selected Duets for Trumpet, Volume 1 is a good resource for all trumpet players and can be used for both practice and two trumpet performance opportunities. Trumpet students will be introduced to many of the musical forms prevalent in the baroque era, the classical era and romantic musical era. The composers represented in the first volume include Viktor Korda, Valentin Rathgeber, Carl Maria von Weber and WA Mozart.

Selected Duets for Trumpet is part of a series of duet books available for many instruments including trumpet (and cornet), trombone, baritone horn (euphonium), French horn, flute, clarinet, saxophone (alto sax and tenor sax) and violin. Each book comes in two volumes. The first volume contains trumpet duets of easy to moderate difficulty, while the more technically challenging duets are concentrated in Volume 2 of the series.

A good prerequisite to the Selected Duets for Trumpet book is the duet book “114 Easy Duets for Trumpet” by Ernest S. Williams, published by Charles Colin. These trumpet duets are generally a bit easier and shorter than the Selected Duets. An analogous book, “114 Easy Duets for Trombone” by Ernest Williams is also available. The Williams duets are suitable for a first year student whereas the Selected Duets are usually not started until the second year of trumpet playing.

If you’re a trumpet player, friend of a trumpeter, or a recording engineer who may be recording a trumpet player, as a further resource you might be interested in David’s article on recording brass instruments that was published in Electronic Musician Magazine.

If you’re a music educator, you may also be interested in David’s Selected Duets for Flute podcast.